Pipeline meetings will begin this week

March 30, 2008

Meetings explain Southern Delivery System, give public the chance to comment on plans.

By CHRIS WOODKA
THE PUEBLO CHIEFTAIN

A series of meetings over the next two weeks will give the public the opportunity to learn more about the draft environmental impact statement issued by the Bureau of Reclamation for the Southern Delivery System and to comment on those plans….

http://www.chieftain.com/metro/1206856800/3 

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Beyond drought: Denver Water prepares for long-term climate change

March 30, 2008

Modest temp increases lead to significant streamflow changes

By BOB BERWYN
summit daily news
Summit County, CO Colorado

March 29, 2008

http://www.summitdaily.com/article/20080329/NEWS/230664127


Pipeline’s ‘Top 10’ list missing floods

March 28, 2008

Fifth in a series By CHRIS WOODKA – THE PUEBLO CHIEFTAIN

http://www.chieftain.com/metro/1206597600/5


Chevron agrees to allow water and fish studies

March 28, 2008

by on March 28, 2008

http://blogs.denverpost.com/eletters/2008/03/28/chevron-agrees-to-allow-water-and-fish-studies/


Overflow from drilling near Parachute has left behind a “waterfall” of frozen gunk and a huge erosion deposit.

March 26, 2008

By Nancy Lofholm
The Denver Post

 “Garden Gulch, a remote ravine north of the town of Parachute, has been the site of four spills and leaks from oil and gas drilling in the past five months…. “

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_8696987 


Get a load of this dam project!

March 26, 2008

Lodge owner [and TU Staffer] Brian Kraft leads the charge against a mine that threatens the Bristol Bay fishery.

“…. According to documents submitted by the mining company….  the pit would be roughly two miles by three miles in size. In the course of mineral extraction, the operation would generate an estimated 2.6 billion tons of waste rock. In order to hold back this waste, the company would have to construct of series of five dams and embankments. Eventually, one of the embankments would be 4.3 miles long and 740 feet high, and another earthen dam would stretch for 2.9 miles and rise to 700 feet high. These structures would be bigger than the Hoover or Grand Coulee dams, and would, in fact, dwarf the Three Gorges Dam in China—presently the world’s largest. All this digging and construction would occur in one of Alaska’s most seismically active areas and at the headwaters of its finest, wildest salmon and trout fishery….:

Read Tim Bristol’s full article from American Angler magazine: http://americanangler.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=521&Itemid=81


A South Platte revival

March 26, 2008

Runoff gives hope of flushing ash residue from ’02 Hayman fire